A delightful anonymous intervention in Indianapolis’ Cultural Trail last October left a series of bright yellow stones carrying the message “We are going to be okay”.

“It’s brilliant,” said Mindy Taylor Ross, director of Public Art for the Arts Council of Indianapolis and the Indianapolis Cultural Trail project. “It’s exactly the kind of thing the team has always hoped that the Cultural Trail would inspire: Random, spontaneous and inspired creativity that is respectful of the Trail as a communal space. This is a great example of how the Cultural Trail is inspiring community conversation.”

via Indianapolis Cultural Trail

PROJECT Re-Entry
LOCATION The Atrium, Federation Square, Melbourne
ARTIST Donna Marcus
DURATION On exhibition until May 29, 2010

One of Donna Marcus’ most recent installations is a large-scale suspended work in Melbourne’s Federation Square. Giant multi-coloured orbs constructed from humble kitchen utensils transform the domestic to the intergalactic. The temporary commission forms part of Federation Square’s Occupy program.

Donna Marcus is represented by Dianne Tanzer Gallery

EXHIBITION CABIN. in the room
ARTIST Carly Scoufos
GALLERY Crucible Gallery, artisan
381 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley, Brisbane
DURATION 22 April – 5 June 2010

Be sure to check out Carly Scoufos’ new exhibition, now showing at artisan’s Crucible Gallery.

Artist’s statement:

“During a recent residency at Youkobo Art Space in Tokyo, I exhibited an installation titled Seam. This work was a direct response to the building itself and the studio I created and presented it in.

During the 1950’s the building served as a clinic and sanatorium for tuberculosis patients. The installation consisted of a sewn and wrapped interior lining made from sheets of Japanese washi paper. The lining of the room and selected pieces of furniture referenced the sterilisation process while also drawing attention to the physical space itself. The sewn sheets of paper defined the forms they enveloped while also reinterpreting the space surrounding them. This created an interplay between form, space and the drawn surface and by presenting the notion of drawing-on-paper in a three dimensional format, it enabled the viewer to enter into the drawn space itself. Due to the delicacy of the paper, Seam also acted as a recorder to absorb the presence of the Japanese visitors who passed through the space.

By re-working and re-presenting this work as CABIN. in the room. it enables the Crucible space (a room within a room within a gallery) to be a section of the same interior space from the Youkobo Art Space in Japan.”

The Crucible space is sponsored by UAP.

This mirrored man, which seems like a sculpture at first glance, is actually a performer suited in a costume covered with small pieces of mirror who was photographed outside Griffith Observatory in downtown LA. An ingenious temporary intervention, the mirrored man plays with notions of sculpture, materiality, motion and interactivity; and reflecting the world around him, he provides an interesting perspective on site-specificity.

Via Toxel | Costume made out of Mirrors

Photos Flickr | SiLver sKY

PROJECT Yellow Treehouse Restaurant
LOCATION near Auckland, New Zealand
ARCHITECTS Pacific Environments | Peter Eising & Lucy Gauntlett
ENGINEERS Holmes Consulting Group
PHOTOGRAPHY Lucy Gauntlett
YEAR 2009

Transporting grown-ups back to their childhood fantasies is this tree house designed by New Zealand’s Pacific Environments Architects. The structure is a curved cocoon-like form fixed high in a redwood tree at the edge of a forest; it boasts a restaurant with views of the surrounding meadows, and is accessed via a gently sloping walkway appropriate for wheelchairs.

From the architects:

“The tree-house concept is reminiscent of childhood dreams and playtime, fairy stories of enchantment and imagination . It’s inspired through many forms found in nature -the chrysalis/cocoon protecting the emerging butterfly/moth, perhaps an onion/garlic clove form hung out to dry. It is also seen as a lantern, a beacon at night that simply glows yet during the day it might be a semi camouflaged growth, or a tree fort that provides an outlook and that offers refuge. The plan form also has loose similarities to a sea shell with the open ends spiralling to the centre.”

The project was developed in collaboration with agency Colenso BBDO and directory Yellow Pages as part of an advertising campaign. A “reality TV” advertising spot was developed around the construction, with all contractors being sourced through the Yellow Pages. The restaurant was then opened to the public from 9 January – 9 February 2009. The site-specific structure uses sustainable materials, including plantation poplar and redwood harvested from the site. It is made weather-resistant with acrylic sheeting and interior vertical roll-down blinds.

The Treehouse has been recognised for its architecture both locally and internationally; it won the 2010 NZ Institute of Architects National Design Award and was a finalist in the 2009 World Architecture Festival Awards.

see also WAN | Tables in the Treetops

The tree-house concept is reminiscent of childhood dreams and playtime, fairy stories of enchantment and imagination . It’s inspired through many forms found in nature -the chrysalis/cocoon protecting the emerging butterfly/moth, perhaps an onion/garlic clove form hung out to dry. It is also seen as a lantern, a beacon at night that simply glows yet during the day it might be a semi camouflaged growth, or a tree fort that provides an outlook and that offers refuge.The plan form also has loose similarities to a sea shell with the open ends spiralling to the centre .

Canon Neoreal 2010

20 April, 2010

PROJECT Canon Neoreal 2010
LOCATION Milan Design Week, Italy
ARTIST Kyota Takahashi
ARCHITECT Akihisa Hirata
ARTWORK Prism Liquid

Canon have put their newest technology into the hands of artist Kyota Takahashi and architect Akihisa Hirata, and the collaboration has given life to Prism Liquid, a captivating installation for Milan Design Week. This is the third annual display in Canon’s Neoreal series, each of which leverages the collaboration between an architect and artist or designer, as well as the most up-to-date imaging tools.

Prism Liquid is a spiraling geometric architectural structure, which provides a myriad of planes for the projection of high definition video. The form is illuminated through a complex system of projectors, appearing to transform from within, a constantly morphing presence in the installation space.

The folks at designboom have documented the process, while more images and video can be viewed at Canon.

Those interested in similar works should see the augmented sculpture of Lichtfront & Grosse8 and Pablo Valbuena.

Images courtesy of Canon